Tuesday, 7 August 2012

Myth: White Women Wash Their Hair Every Day

I recently had an interesting email discussion with a blog reader Shola. Her original question was about the role of coconut oil in preventing excessive uptake of water into hair  (remember hygral fatigue!). She says

'As black women with the driest hair, why should we really even care about hygral fatigue? White women wash their hair every single day, some just shampoo and do not even use a hair conditioner. I am wondering just how damaging would washing your hair every day be? Is hygral fatigue really that bad?'

The first part of her question intrigued me - why is it such a common belief that white women wash their hair every day? Having gone to university and lived in residential halls with many white women  (90%+ of the student population was white), I can tell you for a fact that not all white women wash their hair every day. 

Being a scientist, I took it a step further and asked the small group of white women that I know some of these questions. These were the responses

Q1: How often do you wash your hair?

Every Day - 3
Between 2 -3 times a week - 4
Once a week - 2
Once every 3 weeks - 1

Q2: Do you use hair conditioner after shampooing?

All answered yes except 1 who uses a 2 in 1 shampoo and conditioner.

Q3: In between wash days, do you avoid wetting your hair and if so  how and why?

Yes - 4
No - 3

The reason in general for avoiding wet hair was to reduce/eliminate drying time. Two ways to avoid wetting hair were given - clipping hair upwards and in the second, only allowing the ends of hair to contact the water, avoiding wetting the scalp.

The reasons for wetting hair were to rinse off styling products or to wet hair to reapply styling products.

Q4: What guides you to wash your hair as often as you do?

The most common answer was how greasy (or oily) hair becomes. The second most common answer was to preserve hair colour (i.e if you have a semi permanent colour, the less you wet it, the longer it stays). The third most common answer was about time - i.e needing time to dry hair before leaving the house for work.

From my tiny survey, there is a spread of routines among white women in the same way there is a spread among black women, so I am officially calling it a myth that white women wash their hair every day.

Coming up next : More of my discussion with Shola and the answer to how damaging is hygral fatigue!

Image Credit



46 comments:

  1. White woman here with varying degrees of curls--from kinky 4a to botticell to 2b loose curls--and I shampoo my hair once every two weeks or so, sometimes even longer. I generally also only use hair products that were designed for black women--they tend to work the best for me.(Thank goodness a mixed friend back in high school took me under her wing, otherwise, I would've been a mushroom head my whole life! =)
    ps. Love your show!

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  2. Wow! I never thought all white women washed their hair every single day. Thanks for sharing this post Jc and bringing this to my attention. (SW)

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  3. How would you know if you had Hygral Fatigue or not? I wet my hair often but I don't "wash" it...my Asian friend however washes her hair every day (with shampoo) and she said it seems fine, funny how hair works.

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    1. I'll explain more on hygral fatigue in upcoming posts. I am guessing hair but I would think that your friend more than likely has medium to long hair which is straight or with a minimal wave. This type of hair can get oily very quickly (within a day) hence the frequent shampoo. If hair is bleached or with more of a curl, it does not tend to get oily as much. Shampooing daily works for oily hair.

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  4. A few of my co-workers (who are Latina) wash their hair every day, due to the build up of oils. But, they always mention if they could go without washing for a few days, they would.

    As for me, I prefer the every week (to two week) wash routine. Doing my hair is super time consuming!

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  5. I loved this! HA! I never thought white people washed their hair every day either... (that's why they use hair spray). I even know some Caucasians that put relaxer in their hair to keep it from being curly.

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  6. Good article.

    I have a question: Why do some white women also use a flat iron to straighten their nhair when using a blow-dryer and round brush get its straight enough. I have seen many hairdressers just blow dry the hair and it looks really smooth.

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    1. I do that. I blow dry and straighten with a round brush and hairdryer. Then I go over my bangs on my forehead with a ceramic flat iron, even adding a light coat of hair spray in summer (very humid here in the hot days.) The reason is it looks smoother and more flat after using the flat iron and it stays like that for the whole day. If I don't use the flat iron after straightening with a round brush and blow dryer, it waves a bit or frizz later when it has sufficiently been exposed to humidity either from the air or from the skin the hair lays on.

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  7. Sorry but 10 women is not enough for a valid scientific study. A more interesting question would be, can they wash their hair every day with harsh sulfate shampoos and still have healthy hair? The women who didn't wash their hair did so for styling an to prolong their color. Black women don't wash their hair everyday with sulfate shampoos for the same reason, however, even if we wanted to wash our hair everyday with sulfate shampoos,most of us couldn't because it would be too harsh & our hair would break off. The black women I know with strong healthy hair,who wash everyday, usually are cowashers and are technically just lightly rinsing as opposed to actually washing. I bet you the average white woman could wash her hair every day with a cheap sulfate shampoo and her hair would still grow to her butt in record time.

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    1. Scientific studies have been carried out on as few as 1-2 individuals. However, nobody said this was a valid scientific study, my words were 'my tiny survey'.Honestly I did not ask the women what shampoo they use but my guess would be something from the local supermarket which in all likelihood is a sulfate shampoo. None of the women asked have visible hair damage (I say visible because we all know damage can hide for a long time).

      The women who did not wash their hair every day mostly did so because their hair was not greasy. This is the top reason.

      I agree with you that the average woman (regardless of race) with a straighter texture can gain length easily in spite of products. If you look at black women who opt to leave braids in for longer or who choose to loc their hair, the result is the same - their hair will gain length in spite of products. Ultimately this showcases that hair growth is not about products but rather about physical breakage.

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    2. I don't buy that at all. I know plenty of white women with issues growing out their hair (they certainly complain about it plenty), mostly due to excessive heat use and frequent dyeing. They treat their hair like it's invincible and they pay for it. Just like a lot of black women. I've also seen plenty of white women (and Asian women) with hair that looks straight up FRIED.

      Hair is hair. Nobody's hair(regardless of texture) is insusceptible to damage.

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    3. I agree with you Rissa, women who do daily flat ironing and bleaching do suffer from breakage eventually ( just like the black women who overlap relaxers and flat iron regularly).

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  8. As a black woman with fine, S-curl, 3c/3b/4a hair, I have found that the more often that I co-wash and detangle (with a comb), the better shape my hair seems to be in, with less tangles and minimal breakage.

    I have tried to hop onto the finger-detangling bandwagon, and I have spent the last few months mainly finger-detangling and only using a comb once per week. My hair has suffered. I have been getting so much more breakage than I ever experienced before. I had never even seen an SSK and had only heard stories about them online. Then, I started my finger detangling regimen. SSKs abounded, and they caused so much breakage on my fine hair, it was unbelievable. I know that this goes against everything that I have learned about natural hair (combs are mechanical damage, washing too frequently causes hygral fatigue), but my hair suffered when I took combing and daily co-washing away. Now that I gave up finger-detangling and started daily co-washing again, I have not seen any more SSKs, which has resulted in much less tangling and breakage for me.


    As a frequent wash-and-goer, I've come to the realization that I just need to detangle (with a comb) anytime that I am co-washing in the shower. Although I realize that most women with kinky, curly should wear protective styles to gain length, my hair has flourished in the past year with my wash-and-go routine, so I feel like this is what I will stick with until my hair tells me otherwise. I realize that I might have to find a new routine when my hair gets longer (currently at 14 inches), but for now, this is what works for me. :)

    JC--you (and Hey Fran Hey!) are the main reason that I embarked on my finger-detangling experiment. I also learned from your website about hygral fatigue, and for someone who wants to continue to grow my hair longer, I wanted to avoid the damage that hygral fatigue purportedly brings. However, I have found that everyone needs to learn about the needs of their own hair. I wonder if, for me, the damage of SSKs from finger detangling outweighs the damage of hygral fatigue and combing. It is a balancing act, for sure. I am interested to see if any of your other readers have had similar experiences as me, for I feel like I am going against everything we are supposed to know about natural hair.

    I am so looking forward to your upcoming article on hygral fatigue. Thanks for all of your work, JC!

    P.S. My long-time boyfriend is white, and I also grew up around mostly white people in the U.S. Even if they do not shampoo their hair every single day (my boyfriend does--AND he didn't even grow up with conditioner in his house! And his hair and his mom's hair grow like weeds), the majority of them DO get their hair wet most days of the week--vastly more than the average natural black woman, who I would guess soaks her hair only once a week/every two weeks. I am looking forward to hearing how hygral fatigue affects them and other races (Asian, Latinos) who also wet their hair most days, whether or not they are necessarily shampooing every single time they are getting their hair wet (because whether or not you shampoo does not affect hygral fatigue, correct? Hygral fatigue is just all about your hair being soaked with water). These different ethnicities do tend to have an easier time growing their hair long in a shorter time, on average, than the average black person. They also tend to comb their hair much more frequently than most natural black women, yet they still maintain length, regardless of mechanical damage from combing or hygral fatigue from frequent water exposure. I understand why over-combing can be a detriment to natural black women who want to grow their hair, but other races seem to deal with hygral fatigue just fine (and would probably be surprised if they learned that frequent soaks in water were supposedly so damaging to retaining length!). Maybe the kinkyness and curliness of our hair is somehow greater affected by these hygral fatigue? Looking forward to your article.

    Thanks, JC!

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    1. Your comment was long but very much welcome!! Thanks for contributing and I will discuss all your questions in the future posts.

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  9. Haven't you read that 30% of the interviewed women really did? And what about us, paleskinned guys? Personally I need to wash my hair (shower) before AND after going to the hairdresser, if I do not want to ruin the rest of my day, and AT LEAST once a day on average in summer.

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    1. I have never heard someone actually wash their hair twice a day for a non medical reason (treating infections/dandruff). Your hair must be super oily. 70% of the women interviewed did not wash their hair daily though, I think you may benefit from the last sentences where I emphasise that there are a spread of routines, not just one.

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    2. Well, the reasons for that are actually rather uncomplicated, I want to remove transpiration, which makes my hair feel awful and dirty, (living above a dry cleaner's and under a hot roof transpiration becomes common) and neither comb nor hairdresser can handle my hair well unless it is in a well-hydrated state, it's just too stubborn, spraying does not work, it needs to be soaked. And the same characteristic, which makes it hard to handle while dry, also make the little remaining cut pieces after a visit to the hair dresser's act feel like little needles, which is the reason I need to wash my hair after, as well as before.

      That said, I tend to use rather cheap shampoo, without paying much attention to its composition, wash it out immediately, and avoid all conditioners because in my experience they really ruin the smooth, natural feel of my hair.

      Dutch tap water is basically chlorine-free, by the way.

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    3. How long is your hair Theodore?

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  10. Hey, I am a white woman who reads of a lot of natural hair blogs. I have LONG bleached blonde hair. After highlighting my hair several times, I found that it cannot handle sulfates and silicones anymore. I now use DevaCurl and it is GREAT for my hair although my hair is stick straight.

    But even before I colored my hair, I would only wash it every 2-3 days, and I would ALWAYS use moisturizer, a leave-in conditioner, AND a heat protectant. I don't know many white women with long hair who washed it every day. If the roots get a little oily, just spray on some dry shampoo or baby powder.

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  11. I am also a white girl with long, bleached hair. :) I co-wash between somewhere between every other day and every 3 days. I shampoo about once a week, deep condition about 3 times.'Ethnic' hair techniques have made a HUGE difference in my hair!!

    I have friends with 3b and 2c/3a hair and are caucasian; they do not benefit from traditional shampoo/condition everyday routines.

    However, perhaps her comment stems from some slight truth or comes from a frustrated place. I mean, when I had virgin hair I did actually shampoo and condition my hair every day whether it needed it or not. I never used a leave-in conditioner or deep conditioner, but the only heat-styling I would do was blow-drying as needed. My hair was long, glossy, and strong. I hadn't the slightest clue about anything pertaining to hair, I didn't even know weaves or perms existed: I thought my black friends just took a straightener to their hair. So, I can see how it could be frustrating to go through all of this hoopla for someone who has naturally curly kinky hair if you compare yourself to people who have fine straight texture. I don't mind the extra effort I put into my hair, but I also CHOSE to bleach it understanding my hair would be difficult to deal with. Many people just have to deal with whatever texture they are born with...Experiences will vary, I suppose.

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    1. Yes I think experiences will vary, I find it interesting that you deep condition 3 times a week :)

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  12. Loved this post. I'd like to see a survey of white women's hair length. People seem to think that long hair comes naturally to Caucasians but from what I grew up around, this seemed not to be the case. Most of my classmates and friends were APL to BSL if they had longer hair and I rarely saw hair longer than that except for one hippie girl.

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    1. I agree,that is a good idea.

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  13. hi JC, don't know if my comment will bring anything useful to this discussion. a large part of my family is white, and most of the women do not wash their hair every day, every 2 to 4 days (i'm only talking about the ones that have straight hair) for the varied reasons you mentioned in your survey.
    my white uncles, cousins, and grandpa, however do wash their hair every day, not sure if they use shampoo every day though.
    my husband is white (Dutch, just saying that as i know you live here in the netherlands now), and washes his hair every single day. out of 7 days, he skips shampoo only 2 days, and he NEVER uses conditioner, says it makes his hair too soft n mushy. The days he goes jogging (3 times a week), he washes his hair twice.
    He has lovely healthy hair, that grows well (i give him hair cuts every 2 months), and never feels dry to the touch, and no split-ends.
    i wash my natural hair (3c/4a --> youtube: louloumatou) every 2 to 3 days. before the babies came along, i would often wet it every day under the shower, not necessarily use a cleanser though, but now i have no time, so every 2 to 3 days works well for me.
    i wet my kids' hair most days, shampoo once or twice a week (shea moisture curl n shine shampoo), rest of the time i just use water alone, or a cleansing conditioner (curl junkie daily fix). Max's hair is coarse (strands), very dense, but a very loose curl (3a, with straight wavy parts), and the baby's hair is still straight for now, but i know it will curl up soon.

    it goes to show that it just depends, for every individual. we as kinky-haired women, are not the only ones with different hair that need different things/regimens. And when we get a bit moany about other people (without our hair type) lumping us into the same boat (with regards to hair), we should remember not to do the same thing as well, like assuming/saying/generalising other (than kinky-curly) hair types routines.

    phhheewwww long response, sorry!!

    Fijne dag! groetjes xx

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    1. Thanks for the comment! I also cut my husband's hair! I love the sentiments of your last statement. Some people have fixed ideas on what black hair can and cannot do, it irritates me.

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  14. Interesting!
    I can't wait for part two

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  15. I have Asian hair which I shampoo and condition one day, and rinse and condition the next day. I've noticed that rinsing my hair every day helps with allergies...rinsing off all that pollen/allergens off your hair really helps!

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  16. I wash my hair daily (I'm mediteranean mixed with asian and arabic, very little caucasian in me, and slightly wavy, fine hair). I need it or I can't do my hair properly. It's not greasy per say the day after my last shampoo but it's "coated" enough to preventany proper styling, not even a pony tail looks good. So I wash it unless I know for sure I won't have to go out that particular day. My hair is, according to my hairdresser and my friends, beautiful and healthy looking. It's not dry and has no split ends even when I don't have a cut for few months.
    I use plain, ordinary, cheap shampoo, no conditionner and heat-style it every morning (both with hair dryer and ceramic thingie).

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  17. I see the point you are making Jc--routines vary (even among white women and their supposedly easy to manage hair). I have asked my white friends and acquaintances what they do and some of them wash their hair every day, some of them wash only 2 to 4 times per week, one of them washes with shampoo only once a week and conditioner-washes the other days (she has wavy-curly, 2c hair that she rarely straightens though)...I also know someone who washes and blowdries/flatirons her hair every single day. But I definitely know for a fact that many white women do not wash their hair every day (even if many do).

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  18. No offense, I love this blog, but I don't understand why this post this is here. I think we've all embraced the "all curly girls are alike regardless of race" mantra. But this kind of article encourages the making of comparisons that shouldn't be made.

    I feel like a lot of black women refuse to learn how to take care of their own hair because (since it's maintenance is different from a white person's)they assume that it's "difficult" and "unmanageable" and they resent it, and themselves, for that. I think that bringing attention back to the kind of thinking that we have FINALLY started to distance ourselves from, and on a natural hair blog, is a mistake.

    Black women are different from white women, our hair is different, our looks are different and our standards of beauty are different as well (as they should be). I think the whole natural hair movement has encouraged black women (and curly girls in general) to stop looking to others to tell us (or show us) what we should be, and to look inside ourselves to what WE want and what WE think is beautiful.

    I understand that maybe you were attempting to show how "alike" we all are, but this post may have been counterproductive to that. In summation, (I really felt the need to sugarcoat this)honestly, who cares what white people do with their hair?

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    1. None taken! This blog is here because the question was posed and not for the first time. I do agree that many black women think that their hair is unmanageable because they are using tools and techniques intended for straight Asian or Caucasian hair. Many white women with curly hair also fall into this trap.

      There are many things that I have learned from white people including techniques and products. One of my Asian friends gave me a great lesson several years back because she grew her hair from a short neck length cut to well below her butt in just about 2 years. When she was asked by another (white, natural blonde dyed black, shoulder length straight) how come her hair is so long, she said - 'My hair grows fast, I don't cut it and I don't dye it and I leave it alone'. I loved the simplicity of the reply because it really is that simple - leave your hair alone, do not do damaging things to it. It also applies to most people (with the exception of growth rate).

      You can learn a lot from any race, you just have to open your mind. The point of this post was not to illustrate how similar we are - it was to say there are differences between facts and assumptions.

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  19. The Good Hair/Bad Hair issue comes up between white mothers and their daughters too. It's been a battle my whole life with Mom, and I'm in my late forties now and she's 70. She stopped saying it out loud after I reminded her that I'll be the one picking her nursing home, so she sucks her teeth at me every time she visits now. My Mom has straight hair, but my Dad was nicknamed "Black Vinny" by his family because of his natural 'fro. I wound up with an odd blending of the two. Mom almost DIED when she dragged me into a high-end department store years ago, walked up to the guy working the high-end hair care section, and the guy took one look at me and handed her the products marketed for African-American women and said, "Never wash your hair with clear shampoo again." I don't own a brush like other white women do (it would get stuck in there anyway), can only use a comb, and a wide-toothed one at that, after a shampoo while the hair is wet, and I've gotten a hot comb stuck in my hair and had to have my husband gently cut around it to remove it. I went to a salon run by some Dominican women to try a relaxer once, figuring they would be able to handle coarse white woman hair. They thought they'd only have to leave the product on for a short period of time, but noooooo.....I swear they didn't finally rinse that stuff until a half an hour had gone by. It was funny watching their faces....they sure didn't expect that. I used to wash my hair every day when I was younger because it was what my mother did, and I thought that was just what you were supposed to do, but I don't do that anymore. I'll go about three days between shampoos, and could probably go longer but I can't get that home training out of my head. Then I follow up with a very potent conditioner, plus leave-in conditioner after that.

    Because of the hair, and my father's nickname, I long suspected there might be some "soul" somewhere in my lineage, so to satisfy my curiosity I actually took an ancestry DNA test that supposedly goes back 16 generations. Normally you would wind up with scattered dots across the resulting graph, X percent this, and Y percent that, and Z percent that. Mine came back as a straight line. 100 percent Western European. So I guess the stories about my ancestors being from Germany, Holland and England were true. So not all white women of European ancestry can toss their hair.

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  20. Most white woman do wash their hair everyday they think its dirty not t,o like a shower is not a shower without washing your hair. I am half white and half latina with fine wavy hair but a lot of it. I used to wash my hair everyday cuz thats what my white washed over actually latina mother taught me to do. My hair was like a puffy pyramid & sooo dry. I started washing my hair only twice a week then once a week & it totally transformed my hair. But i also had my family looking at me like i was dirty or trying to be black lol. Im telling you that study is wrong. My hair does get greasy after a couple days but i just either sprinkle some baby powder on my roots to absorb the oil or put baby oil mid length to my ends , do an updo and hairspray my roots to soak up the oil. I have never cowashed but i am going to try it using Prell moisturizing clean rinse conditioner i bought the other day at CVS :)

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  21. Wow! I found your blog because I was looking up an ingredient in a conditioner. I found the topics I clicked on very informative and helpful, and I have been smiling at the bits of blog posts and responses I've seen. I am white. My mother has coarse curly hair. My dad has fine, thin, almost straight hair. My dad washed his hair almost every day. My mom every three or four days except when she started going to the beauty parlor. Then it was once a week. When I was a kid, I washed my hair once a week. The only time in my life I've washed my hair one day after the other is when I was swimming a lot. Over the years my hair has changed a lot. I was born with a full head of curly hair. When it fell out, what came in was straight. For many years my hair was extremely thick and wavy. Now, in my 50s most my hair is medium textured, fairly thick, and curly or kinky with the hair at the nape of my neck fine, thin, and slightly wavy. About 15 yrs. ago I noticed that my hair had changed and I began using a pick rather than a brush to style my hair. My hair has gotten progressively curlier. About 6 mos. ago I began cleansing my hair with conditioner rather than shampoo. Before that I had tried various mild shampoos, organic mixtures, etc. I like cleansing with conditioner, because its gentler on my hair and because my hair stays smoother (less frizzy) for a longer period of time so that I don't have to cleanse as often. I use a pick a little here and there once my hair is dry over the days between cleansing in combination with finger combing. A few times I spritz with tap water or less seldom with a WEN styling spritz. I do use WEN's style gel--just a little--and I have BSL hair. I usually go between 3 and 7 days before cleansing my hair; most often 5 days. I have 6 daughters and 3 sons. Not one of them washes his hair every day, and most go at least three days before washing their hair. They have varying types of hair: kinky, wavy, board straight, curly. I have friends from all 'racial' groups and varying 'ethnicities'. I've noticed that fussing with our hair is common to all of us, and some of us who have straight hair envy those of us who have curly hair and vice versa. I've told all my kids that the less they mess with the hair God gave them, the better!

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  22. I found some of the opinions and experiences very interesting to read through, and thought I would add some of my own. I'm from regional Australia and white, with curly hair (3a/some 3b).
    Hair length isn't just determined by how much you damage it. Everyone naturally has a different hair growth cycle, of how long the strand grows before it 'dies' and falls out. I'm attaching a wiki link, just because it explains it well.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_hair_growth
    I have a relatively long growth cycle, so I can grow my hair to about midback. My sister has almost identical curl structure, but a shorter growth cycle, so the longest she has ever had her hair is just below shoulder length (when stretched out).
    In regards to shampooing - I didn't realise how often white women didn't shampoo until I moved to univeristy. I grew up on a small farm. When you live with horses, dogs, and throw hay out the cattle, it's kind of necessary to shampoo everyday. My mother also had straight hair, and didn't really know how to handle our curls, lol.
    After moving to university and living with a variety of other people, most women didn't shampoo their hair everyday. At most, 2 or 3 times a week. Most of them did not have coloured or treated hair. They just shampooed when their scalp got too oily, just as I do now.
    I don't know about conditioning habits though, nor about manly shampoo habits.
    I condition my hair everyday, and apply a leave in moisturising product afterwards.

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  23. It's always interesting to see, or want to know about, the similarities and differences of the races. I myself used to ask some of my black girlfriends about their grooming techniques because it seemed so different from my own. Well ladies, I am a white woman, and not necessarily wanting to speak for all woman within my race, I will go out on a limb and say that pretty much all caucasians believe that good grooming and hygiene consists of showering everyday which includes washing your hair. It's important that I emphasize the fact that this is believed to be a necessary duty to achieve good hygiene, because after all, who hasn't missed a shower? Especially as women, I'm sure for all of you who have children, after taking care of them it can be near impossible to do something as simple as bathe yourself. And of course, you could get sick and so on. But outside of missing a shower for a legitimate reason, you would just be considered gross to go without one. To be honest, if I don't shower, I dread leaving the house. I hope this cleared some things up! Happy grooming!

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    1. Showering is different from washing hair. Many people believe in the daily shower but that does not mean their hair also gets washed daily. If you have natural hair that is very kinky and curly, I would definitely think you should not be shampooing every day, it is just too much for this hair type.

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  24. I'm african American with curly kinky hair and I shampoo every other day. Some of my white friends wash their hair even less than I do.

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  25. I'm currently in Uni and every white roommate I've ever had washed their hair everyday. I'd always hear them in the shower forever and then they'd come out and blow dry it. EVERY SINGLE DAY. I'd also always hear whines from other white girls who weren't my roommates talking about "Omg my hair is so greasy. I didn't wash it this morning"

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  26. I'm white, with very thick, very long, curly, coarse hair. My hair is dry and looks best if washed only every three or four days, but I have to wash it every other day or the scalp is itchy. I don't use commercial conditioners because I'm allergic to them, I use olive oil on my hair after every shampoo. Regardless of how often I wash, my hair grows like a weed, I don't know how long it could actually grow, it's been past the middle of my back several times before I trimmed it, I think it could grow as long as I let it. My sister has long very straight hair with medium texture, she washes every day and her hair grows as long as she wants it to as well, I'm going to say heredity and genetics might a lot to do with hair length, perhaps some people have a limit to the length their hair will grow before falling out or becoming fragile no matter how often they wash.

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  27. I'm black and have curly natural hair. I have a lot of white and Asian friends and the majority who don't have naturally straight hair don't wash their hair every day. Because they don't like having to use the heat every day to make it straight. The naturally straight people say because of oiliness they shampoo but studies show the sulfates actually make it worse used every day.. White people with curly hair are going to Wen and cleansing conditioners. One of my friends uses Shea Moisture. I shampoo once a week and cowash every other day. My hair thrives with water.

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