Monday, 23 January 2012

Caucasian hair under the microscope

Do you remember the microscope pictures of (my) African hair? Well, one of you asked for a comparison picture of Caucasian hair. My husband was happy to oblige. He has very dark brown straight hair. The shaft is fairly round and as my husband keeps his hair short the ends are pretty much scissor cut perfection.

Mostly round hair shaft

Hair ends
We both agreed that his hair is  not particularly interesting (no kinks, no curls, no knots, no super ellipticity), pretty typical for someone with naturally straight hair. However, since you asked, here it is!

16 comments:

  1. You don even know how excited I get when you pull out your microscope. Thanks for the post.

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    1. lol! Thank you for the comment :)

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  2. Oooohh cool. You make me wanna get a microscope now.

    guyanesesista.blogspot.com

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  3. Does mixed race hair show up as different under the microscope - my children who are mixed race have different hair textures to each other and to their parents. I just wondered if mixed hair is a mixture of the different races or totally different.

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    1. Most likely a mix I would think, I don't have any samples to confirm

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  4. LOL definitely interesting. But I am wondering if this experiment truly classifies a person of white skin hair type? When there is curly hair white people, etc. I think if you break it down to their nationalities and not the color of ones skin , then the results would have more meaning. Or even classifying hair types. My husband is from India and his hair is thick and straight, verses my curly frizz. I would Love to see different hair types from different nationalities.

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    1. I think much like African hair there will be variations. Not all African hair is kinky, some is just curly. I also think that the kink level also differs with some with very kinky hair and others with just a few.

      So this applies to straight dark Caucasian hair which is cut frequently.

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  5. Lol @ not particularly interesting. Thanks for sharing. At least now we know what it looks like under the 'scope.

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  6. Not particularly interesting? Not that I saw what was so "interesting" in our own hair under a microscope, other than the fact that you looked at more strands. I just feel a way when naturals get all condescending about this whole hair thing. My grandmother was white with curls and kinks too but hey...I guess us African Americans (re: naturals) are just greater. -_-

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    1. I find it so strange that people like you choose to misinterpret and distort words. Did you realise that I said that both my husband (whose hair is pictured) and I agreed on the 'not that interesting' bit? It is not about one texture being better than another, it is about the fact that his hair has two main features (1. shaft is round, 2. ends are scissor sharp). Meanwhile for African hair I found (1. shaft is very elliptical 2. straight ends 3. fibrillated ends 4. knots of varying appearance 5. signs of hair damage 6. split ends)

      Interest as far as science goes is about the number and novelty of discoveries. If something surprises you or looks more unusual then it holds your interest more. This is true for me as much as it is for my husband.

      I can clearly tell that you have not been on this blog for long because I am actually African, not African American and I never indulge in topics that I consider useless (such as texture wars, relaxed hair v natural hair, stereotyping on race). Raise the bar higher MedSchool.

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    2. Well said JC!!!

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  7. This is great! Please know that you do have Caucasian readers. I understand my hair is different from yours, but there are similarities, too, and a lot of what you write is universal. So much of the available information about hair care comes from advertising, or beauty editors catering to their advertisers. You write truth, you explain the science clearly, and you're not trying to sell me anything. That is so rare, and so very refreshing.

    That said, I'm reading this post with my cat in my lap, and the mad scientist in me can't help but wonder what her fur looks like under a microscope . . .

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    1. lol I have cats too, one shed a whisker! I have saved it to look under the microscope.

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